Data storage is rapidly changing from a product we carry around to a service we pay for -- and while it's not as often we highlight resource-impacting improvements in a service field, scientists at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) have thought up a great one.

Instead of storing all those 1s and 0s as charged particles "trapped" in one position or another on a chip -- requiring a certain amount of shielding materials to protect the particles from magnets or stray electrical current -- TUM researchers propose using the vibration of tiny nanotubes, clamped at both ends like the strings of a guitar. The nanotubes can be individually "plucked" and an optical sensor detects which are vibrating and which remain still.

The nanotubes, almost unimaginably tiny in their own right, would require zero additional materials for electromagnetic shielding, potentially delivering more data storage in smaller spaces -- reducing the physical and environmental footprint of global data centers we use every day.

1 Comment